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Don't Forget the Crawl Space

Posted by Emillie Lee

Aug 31, 2016 11:00:00 AM

 

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When building energy-efficient homes, there is one space that is commonly overlooked -- the crawlspace. If you have a crawlspace in your existing home, or will have one in your new home plans, make sure you insulate it properly. Spray foam insulation is a great material choice for this project.

An uninsulated crawlspace can cause all sorts of issues in a home. As cold air accumulates in the crawlspace, it cools off the interior rooms, forcing your heating system to work harder, which wastes energy. An uninsulated crawlspace can also accumulate moisture, leading to mold development. Mold spores can get carried into the main living areas of the home, contributing to allergic reactions.

When insulating a crawlspace, it is important to insulate both the floor and the ceiling of the space, since both are in contact with the outdoors. Spray foam is a great choice for the project for several reasons:

  • It is moisture-resistant, so it won't contribute to mold buildup in this space.
  • It is lightweight, so almost all home structures can support it.
  • Spray foam is easy for a contractor to apply, even in a closed-off area such as an existing crawlspace. It starts as a liquid and expands to fill the space to which it is applied.
  • SPF has a very high R-value, which is a measure of its insulating ability. Essentially, this means that even a thin layer will provide as much insulation as a much thicker layer of fiberglass.
  • SPF minimizes the amount of air infiltration, which means that less air will escape from your home during the summer and winter. Not only will heating costs be lower, but cooling costs will be, too.

Visit the NCFI website to learn more about building energy-efficient homes with spray foam, or to find a spray foam applicator near you.

Topics: Home Design, InsulStar, NCFI