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Insulation as Investment: The Best Places to Protect

Posted by Emillie Lee

Jul 20, 2016 1:49:57 PM

If you're looking for ways to save on energy bills, adding more insulation to your home is a wise choice. In order to ensure you save as much as possible, it's important that you put that insulation in the right places. Whether you're using traditional insulation or spray foam materials for your construction projects, here's a look at three locations that you must insulate to get the biggest bang for your buck.

Underneath Your Floors

Even if your floors are carpeted, you lose a lot of heat through these surfaces. Hardwood and laminate floors are especially poor at holding in heat. Installing additional insulation underneath your floors will help reduce your heating bills considerably, and will also make your floors more comfortable to walk on. Spray foam insulation tends to be best for this task since it can be blown into spaces through small holes.

Crawl Spaces

Many crawl spaces are under-insulated because homeowners assume that as long as they keep the door shut, the cold air will stay in the crawl space. This isn't quite true. The chilly wall between the crawl space and your home's interior will suck heat out of your home, so insulating the crawl space is essential.

Around Pipes and Wires

If you have fiberglass batt insulation, there are probably gaps around electrical wires and pipes that pass through your attic or basement floor or ceiling. Chilly air can flow through these gaps, increasing your heating costs. Sealing them off with spray foam insulation is an excellent, money-saving choice.

Different types of insulation have different purposes. Open-cell spray foam works well under floors and in crawl spaces, while closed-cell insulation is great for sealing around pipes. Contact NCFI Polyurethanes for more information about the best materials for your construction projects.

Topics: NCFI