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Spray Foam Chemicals Are Seeing Increasing Demand

Posted by Becky Eades

Nov 3, 2015 4:21:47 PM

 

The use of spray foam in both homes and commercial buildings has increased over the past few years, and this trend shows no signs of slowing down. According to a recent report, demand for on-site applications of spray foam chemicals is predicted to increase by 8.2 percent by 2018. By this time, experts expect that $12.1 billion worth of spray foam chemicals will be used in the US each year.

Why are spray foam materials on the rise? The reason can be mostly traced to the recent recovery in the housing market. When the US market crashed several years ago, building decreased. However, the housing market is now on the upswing, and builders are receiving more orders for newly built homes. Most of these homes are designed to be very energy-efficient, and spray foam is a big part of that since it leads to reduced energy bills in comparison to homes where fiberglass insulation is used. The recovery of the housing market is expected to continue over the next few years, and the demand for spray foam will continue to increase with the market.

The increased demand for spray foam materials is also related to a boom in non-residential construction. New office buildings and commercial structures are being built as the economy improves. The owners of these buildings are demanding the use of spray foam as well as other high-tech alternatives to traditional building materials. There is a transition towards longer-lasting building solutions that require less maintenance, and spray foam fits the bill.

If you work as a spray foam applicator, it's time to stock up on spray foam materials for your construction projects, as demand for your services will be increasing. You can find spray foam materials for your construction projects, as well as SPF equipment, on NCFI Polyurethanes' website.

 

Topics: Spray Polyurethane, NCFI